Reactions after an Intro to WordPress Workshop

Today I led a workshop to introduce folks to WordPress. Here are some quick reactions I had.

I installed ten fresh WordPresses on a single shared hosting plan for users to going through exercises in the admin interface with me in realtime. Either the server could not deal with 20 concurrent users or the local network couldn’t. Hosting is still hard 😤

We often use “WordPress.com vs. WordPress.org” to describe the difference between running a site on WordPress.com and the limits that imposes vs. running a site with a more liberal web host. I get the spirit of the comparison, but it’s confusing. For example, managed WP hosts may blacklist plugins, so WP.com is not the only one that has a “walled garden.” Some other metaphor like a “spectrum of control” is probably more to the point, with WordPress.com being at one end, owning your own datacenter at the other, and most web hosts in the middle.

I have no clue what the difference is between Categories and Tags. On the version 2.3 page (when Tags were introduced) “Web” is an example category and “web development on windows” is a tag. The distinction I glean from this is categories are to be typed uppercase and tags lowercase. Suffice to say I’ll be removing the Tags feature from my blog.

I found it intensely useful to take off my developer hat for a morning and get into the mindset of a user of software I work on, and see the inventive solutions of users without writing a line code.

Super Emoji Plus+ is now in beta

The other night I installed WordPress. While writing my first blog post I wanted to put an emoji in the content. I opened a new browser tab and googled “100 emoji” just to copy and paste a character, like a schlub. This process has got to end.

I’m pleased announce the release of my new WordPress plugin Super Emoji Plus+, which makes it easy to insert emoji into your WordPress content. 😎

After you install, click the Emoji button in the Editor to bring up a contextual menu to select your emoji. You can type to search for an emoji (it uses Emoji annotations for the search completion), and navigate results with the arrow keys. Click on a character or hit Enter to insert it into the content, and press escape when you’re done.

Or, while you’re writing in the editor, type a colon and a word for an emoji (like “:airplane”). The menu with search results will come up inline.

The plugin is in beta, so if you have any problems let me know on Github! 💁

Obligatory New Blog Statement of Intention

Oh man I just fired up a new web log. That means one thing: a statement of my plans and inspirations for this here digital notebook must be set. Unlike New Years resolutions I will actually keep to these tenets. So here we go:

  1. Keep it 💯
  2. Blog Every Day™
  3. Always be on the lookout for Hot New Widgets to keep my readers interested and engaged